Episode 87 - Throwing Yourself in the Deep-End with Sam Barlow from Barlow Building

December 03, 2022
Episode 87 - Throwing Yourself in the Deep-End with Sam Barlow from Barlow Building

Aaron Kyle
Hello, I'm Aaron Karl and welcome to another episode of Build Hatch. Well this week's episode of pure hatch, I got to sit down with that first Gold Coast builder on the show. Sam Barlow from bolo building. I really enjoyed spending some time speaking with Sam right here on the Gold Coast, about the building construction industry, which is going gangbusters right now. As you'll hear, there are some really big demand for high end architectural builders on the Gold Coast and surrounding Surfers Paradise. And Sam and his team are leading the charge by filling the gap of offering custom build high end quality projects are really enjoyed our chat, not only talking about the building construction industry on the Gold Coast, but also discussing the wonderful lifestyle, including achieving what we're all after and building life. That is the work life balance. Like I said, I really enjoyed having Sam on our show being the first Queensland guest on your page. So let's get into it. Okay, Sam from Barlow building on the Gold Coast. Welcome to build hatch. Thank you for having me. You're our first Gold Coast guests, which is exciting. There's plenty going on in the construction space. So Sam, how's things going here on the Gold Coast?

Sam Barlow
Yeah, the last two years have been pretty full on like, I'm sure most builders around Australia, but I just can't really see it slowing down on the Gold Coast at the moment is such a good place to live the infrastructure and venues we have up here now it's such an attraction for people you know, you've got the lifestyle, obviously, of living on the Gold Coast. But then you've also got, you know, the jobs to go with it now I think sort of 510 years ago, your Gold Coast always been such an awesome place to be an awesome place to live. But we still didn't have the jobs or the infrastructure on the Gold Coast to make it so this is a substantial place for a lot of people to live. It's probably one of the one of the area's that's I've noticed over the last sort of five years that the Gold Coast has proved in a lot.

Aaron Kyle
Have you always grown up here on the Goldy?

Sam Barlow
I was originally born in Tassie, I moved over the Gold Coast parents moved up here when I was two and I've been here ever since. And I've always said to my partner, the only two places I'll live is into the Gulf Coast, or the sunny coast. However, I think Bali might be on the cards later on in my life.

Aaron Kyle
Now what was it like growing up here on the Gold Coast?

Sam Barlow
Is such a magical spot the beaches here absolutely unreal. So it's such a morning place like you know I love going down to Melbourne and Sydney for little holidays and getaways with either my partner or or some mate. But I always notice you know, everyone up on the on the Gold Coast is all early starters. We're always up so early, you got coffee shops open early. It's nice to be able to go for a swim before you can sort of go to the gym, go for a swim before you get stuck into work. Just clear the brain for the day. Yeah, definitely.

Aaron Kyle
Yeah, before here about follow building, I always like to take a guess back to how they aspired to get in the construction industry. So getting into building from a young age was that always on the cards was it?

Sam Barlow
I definitely was I originally was a landscaper. So I did landscape construction from when I was sort of 14 and a half 15 till I was about 19 or 20.

Aaron Kyle
So did you leave school then?

Sam Barlow
Yeah, I dropped out there in grade 10. To start my landscaping, construction apprenticeship. It sort of led me although I did landscape construction for the first four years, very similar sort of work to what you do when you're doing carpentry anyway. So like we're doing retaining walls, fences, decking sort of stuff. So I mean, like I said, a lot of people, your first two years of building anyway, or doing any sort of trade is really just getting that those hand skills and having a general understanding of you know, how to use basic tools and just wrapping your head around, I suppose how that construction industry sort of operate.

Aaron Kyle
So you're always sort of that outdoors sort of person.

Sam Barlow
I'd definitely even when I was doing landscaping, as much as I loved it. I used to have a mate, who his brother was a builder. And I used to go around to his house on a Friday or Saturday, when I was younger to have a beer and we would set him home. I love the houses that you build. I want to come and work with you on that. And he used to say yeah, you know, eventually, eventually, and it was actually funny. He called me one day and he goes, How long do you finish the landscape? apprenticeship? And I said this last Tuesday and I said, I finished my last days on Thursday. He goes, you want to do some work on Saturday? And I said, Yeah, I called up my boss and I said, a landscape boss. I said, Hey, I've got a new job. I'm, I'm gonna go do my carpentry apprenticeship because at this stage, I sort of knew that I wanted to be a builder. So I always enjoyed looking at houses enjoyed architecture design. And anyway, guys, yeah, no dramas. That's fine. And I rocked up on the Saturday and I could have quit my job and he goes, I may have weekend weekend work for you. And I said are that's all right. Well, I don't have a job any More. So any work that you have, just give it to me because you know, I want to do this, I want to work for you. He was doing high end residential builds. And that's sort of exactly what I wanted to do.

Aaron Kyle
Tell me about the transition, I guess from Save landscape construction over to residential construction.

Sam Barlow
When I work with some of my apprentices. Now, they always, you know, I get comments on, you know, the quality of your work, which you have to have when you're doing high end, residential builders is something that as a chippy, you have to be relentless with how high end the work is, you know, you're working on multimillion dollar homes. And I, like I say to my boys, when they suck things up, I don't think there was anyone that was a shit of a carpenter as I was when I started. I said, but if you've always put in the time and the effort, you guys will end up good. I just had this mentality from when I started, you know, I remember mine on my first days, and I was having the builder say, you know, cut me know, going to 403 him, I'd pass it to him. And he'd go, this is this is a millimetre out, this is two millimetres out in my brain landscape. And I was like, that is that's perfect. Like, I just didn't, I just didn't understand it afterwards, about two years down the track, because I was so close to getting rid of you a couple times, because you know, you're, the quality of your work just wasn't up there. But he goes, You put so much time and effort into being good and nice. I'm so happy that I kept you guys, anytime that I thought of, you know, possibly just letting you know that I wasn't good enough, you could, you would work twice as hard as anyone else just to make sure that something could look good. And I was just like, sort of the mentality I've had with everything, like, you know, even with dropping out of school early and stuff, it was it was really hard to start to get to be able to communicate with clients through emails and stuff, which for some people, it's so simple, but for me, it really wasn't, it was something that I'd had the same mentality, I thought, you know, if it takes me two hours to write an email, you know, that's what happened for not not listening in school, this is your punishment, you're going to have to learn eventually, someone else may be able to write the email in 10 minutes, 20 minutes, you might take an hour or two hours. But as long as you know, this isn't going to be forever, you're gonna get better at stuff and sort of just always had that mentality with anything that I've done,

Aaron Kyle
I obviously see a lot of disputes in in construction, and, and quite often you can tell where the problems have arisen. And a lot of them is that emotional intelligence or that emotional intellect that we as humans don't often get taught, and there's no textbook, there's no hard or fast rule, you don't get taught these things, it's, it's relationships, and no relationship is the same and no personality is the same. So when you're putting it all together, it can go different ways. And, and often it comes down to, well, you know, what, maybe that person wasn't taught or they don't understand it's not a personal thing. They just, they're just not aware of it. Definitely. So if you have that continually improving and, and listening, those simple skills can go a long way, in Canada,

Sam Barlow
I think there's anything that can be honesty, and nothing can beat someone that works hard, you can be as talented as you want. If you don't have the work ethic, you're not going to get you know, nowhere near as far there's my personal opinion is, you know, nothing can be hard work. And also, I think clients see that as well. Like, you also have to be open with your communication with them. Nothing, nothing beats honesty, but two things that my, my old man's always taught me to communication, communication, communication. And just to be honest with, with people like you notes, we're in the building industry, things go wrong, it's, you know, as much as we try to hide it, you know, and we don't show it show all the stuff that can go wrong in our you know, in our social media and stuff. We all know that, you know, everyone has the same sort of issues. If you're honest with your client, you can't go wrong, like sometimes you'd have to, you know, hey, something's gone wrong, or a trade, let me down or whatever. And at the builder, you're the forefront of that. But if you're honest, at least, you're not dragging them out. You've informed them as soon as you know, and sometimes you know, straightaway, they're going to be a bit upset that they're in the long term , they're gonna appreciate the honesty. And it just otherwise, if you don't have honesty, especially in building, it just goes downhill so quickly.

Aaron Kyle
Yeah, definitely. Your business is called Barlow building. When did you make the transition into starting your own company?

Sam Barlow
So my wife, Chelsea, who works with us full time, who I've just married, I originally was going to be called complete construction. I was working for a company on the Gulf Coast, who I did my whole apprenticeship for. And I was starting to, I don't want to say run his jobs, because I definitely want you know, there's a lot more at the time, I probably thought I was because I didn't understand the back end of the business as much. You know, I was at home and my partner studied business at unbind and has done quite well in business. And she sort of said, you know, what are you doing you're, you're working for another builder, you're pretty much doing a lot of stuff yourself? Well, I don't think she actually realised either. How much stuff I probably still did have to learn. But I just had the mentality that I sort of had felt like I'd learned as much as I could in the industry. And the only way I was going to I was going Learn More was throwing myself in the deep end and doing stuff always had that mentality of, I don't care if it's gonna take me twice as long as someone else at the start, I'm still going to give you the best product, I won't leave until it's the best at the start things would take me a little bit longer. It took me a little bit longer to understand, or sort of get procedures and stuff where you know, maybe if I'd stayed with someone else for another two years, I probably would have had but I think that it's a fast way of growing. Throw yourself in the deep end and you're either going to sink or you're gonna swim and there's no way I was gonna bloody sink.

Aaron Kyle
So you went out on your own. So did you have a project lined up? Did you have some clients? How did that work?

Sam Barlow
I had the builder I was contracting to just say to me, I've got two weeks been a little bit quiet. He actually said to me to do anyway, you're gonna get better. It's like taking on some weekend work. And I just started taking on some weekend work. And then he actually a little bit upset because I was one I wouldn't touch my phone at work I would the phones in the SKU that doesn't matter. Everyone would know. Sam will not answer his phone at work. And because I was starting to get some weekend work I started just answering my phone and I could tell he was getting a little bit upset and I was like made this work. weekend work like he told me to do like he sort of part path that way. But then it just got a little bit hard that it was you know, he was getting a bit upset. I was going on weekend work with a head Barlow building on my car. And then I had a making construction trailer on as well. And it was get a bit messy. So good advertising. Yeah, I'm still with me to this day. So I honestly couldn't thank him enough for what he's taught me.

Aaron Kyle
How did you sort of grow? At what point do I need to grow and put on an apprentice? Or did you put on a supervisor or qualified How did that work

Sam Barlow
pretty much just bought on it was a labour, but pretty much an apprentice straightaway. It's really just, I suppose, like anyone knows the growing stages so hard, because you don't want to over commit to someone and be having to pay their wage, but then, you know, I'm such a soft person, people and I think that's it shows in the culture of my company, but, you know, I couldn't just go out and hire someone for a week, and then, you know, just lay them off or whatever, it's sort of always felt that responsibility, hey, you know, I gotta provide for them as well. So I've just always, you know, I think I've waited till I needed, maybe one and a half people, and then I put sort of one on. And it's just, I think in business, you know, there's always like that scale of going up where it sort of, you know, you go up, and then you sort of come a little bit down and you go up again, and you just need to, you know, in those stages where you're coming down, you may be doing, you know, 12 to 16 hours, 15 hours a day, you're coming home, and it's just what you got to do us still to this day, like yesterday, you know, I do my book work in the morning, I go, I spent eight hours on the Tools, and then I come home and I'd do another five hours. It's just, you just got to do what you can do. And you know, until you really are, I feel my personal opinion, it probably is until you really are struggling, say at least two months worth of work then sort of start to put someone on because you don't want to, you know, stuff around with other other people's lives as well. Like, I've always felt it's a big responsibility taking people aren't that committed. They need money for their family, for their families as well. Yeah, it

Aaron Kyle
certainly is. Just occasionally, I'm hearing like sound is accidental tap on the mic or something just a little. Oh, yeah. Yeah, that's all right. All right. So tell us about bio building now. Like how many is in your team doing some amazing projects here on the Gold Coast?

Sam Barlow
Yep. So there's 11 of us now 11 of us in the team. Chelsea in the office, I've got to sort of I call them site leaders, a few apprentices and cheapies. And stuff underneath. We got a culture here is honestly second to none where else we're all really close. When my head carpenters I actually worked under so he was the carpenter at the company I did my apprenticeship with so we've been together for 11 years. We've got a warehouse getting built at the moment. So we can open up a office and stuff at the end of the year, which is also good, because it's getting a bit old. Having that office at home feel like you can never escape that.

Aaron Kyle
Now that's exciting. Now, you mentioned culture like what are some of the things that you think have kind of developed your your culture within Barlow building,

Sam Barlow
I say to people all the time, and it almost gets me when I when I talk to my boys about it almost gets me a little bit emotional. I just genuinely care about the people that work with me. And when I see that they put in that effort towards me, it's, I feel like I need to put in effort back towards them. Like, it's I just had my wedding and I had four for my workers there like it's, it's not a forced relationship. It's that I genuinely and I say that to the boys as well as I genuinely do care. And, you know, I have some boys that work. Like one of my guys. He works for days because I sort of he wasn't he wasn't, I could notice he wasn't happy. And then I sort of started thinking to myself, you know, he's 50 years old. He's got kids, he wants to be at home with his kids and I tried to do sort of work around the boys as much as I can, I think that it's changing a lot. Just in general, the work environment, like you need to give people that little bit of flexibility. You know, people don't want you to be screaming down down their neck. It's one of the main things if I say, Well, I employ people, I said, there's two, two main things when you come and work with us, it is your energy. So if you're someone that's going to drain our energy, we don't want you. And the second is the way that you treat our promises. So I say to them, you know, I've had apprentices make 1000s of dollars and mistakes at the end of jobs that push out handover dates and stuff. And I say to them, I said, Have you ever seen me raise my voice? At my premises? No, I haven't. So why do you think you guys can talk like that? It's just sort of the two big, big things. And when I first started, I used to have, you know, as you do, you set out your goals. And I'd say, have a really good carpenter have two really good carpenters. And then I realised how hard it was to get. So I was sitting down one day, and I thought, you need to change your goal, create these good carpenters. So get them young, or, you know, get them at the second year and start creating carpenters. And now that I'm sort of, you know, five, six years in, I'm starting to see that where I've had people from first year that are now running projects, running jobs for us, the smaller jobs, and then I'm starting to see you guys apart from first year, you know, then in our teaching our other apprentices, it's rewarding, and they've also been taught the correct way and the way you want, they know the culture of the company. So anyone else that comes in, if they're not a good suit, you can, you know, these people have been with you for four or five years, you can trust their opinion of him, like, hey, you know, the energy's not right, or whatever. And, you know, you still have to just move them on,

Aaron Kyle
do you get together with your team, often, like sort of do some team building exercises and stuff like that

Sam Barlow
we most Fridays will do something together, whether it's having a beer or sit down, because I used to talk a lot in the meetings and you know, almost just bombard them with information, when the days are kind of just take a step back and let them do all the talk talking. Soak it in and ask them where I there's sort of three questions I normally ask, what have we done in the last month that you've really, really enjoyed, and you want to keep doing was something that we haven't done that you want to start? And what's something that we're doing at the moment that sort of needs needs improvement. So I just sort of tried to put it on to them as much as we can and say, you know, is any systems that you guys want to implement, and try to just listen to them as much as much as I can, especially as we get a bigger team as well. I think it's important to still give everyone a voice.

Aaron Kyle
Yeah, definitely has it all going here on the Gold Coast with trades and getting quality trades and stuff like that, like, Is it challenging, here's what it is everywhere else.

Sam Barlow
All builders rely on just that relationship they've had with trade, obviously, this year, has been a little bit harder, where builders used to have almost the upper hand and you know, people trade wanting to work for builders, so they bend over backwards, when now it's, you really have to be careful as a builder, and sort of how you approach stuff and you can't put too much pressure on. But this is how I operate anyway, you know, I don't want to be putting too much pressure on trades, because I sort of understand the stress of you know, they've probably got another five builders that probably aren't as relaxed as what I am breathing down their neck. So I'm just trying to make long gone are the days where you'd call them to hug and drop in two, three weeks, come and do it. We're sending people you know, we'd booked in a drama, hey, six months, we're aiming for this date in October. And then every two or three weeks, we're sending them updates of sort of where that scandal is out at the moment. It's just a shortage of labour. And I'm, I really can't see it getting any better than

Aaron Kyle
the people that experienced the worst conditions or more the people that are, I guess, isolated areas, you know, like, I'm not suggesting you have it easier because you're on the Gold Coast, but you do have access to a large pool of resource people that want to live there and work there. Because they're getting that work life balance, then, like you said, it's about having those relationships with those people and planning well ahead. Yeah, definitely.

Sam Barlow
Even like I remember, obviously, when the timber was really, you know, the timber shortages were really bad for them was taken up to like six months to get floor systems as much as was a bad thing. But you said, you know, you try to look at the good in sort of anything otherwise you get so caught up and things can make you up in my head. I just thought you know what, this is going to weasel out all these people that aren't as organised as others it's, you know, you can't just go you know, get to the fourth system and then Sadie Sadie client, hey, we just tried to order the floor system and you know, it's a six month wait, like, You got to be organised. So, I mean, it's probably a good thing for the industry in a way because it's making all builders be a lot more organised and you know, as things go back, if they do back to normal, it's everyone's just gonna be so used to scheduling so far in advance. I think it's going to almost push drops through faster as long as we can obviously get the labour to do

Aaron Kyle
100% Alright Sam, so you're well known with your recently completed belly apartment project. So tell us about that.

Sam Barlow
What a job

Aaron Kyle
complicated

Sam Barlow
Yes. So I had the my clients come to me with a after seen at a vestment property apartment that I've renovated and that just bought two penthouses above the property and asked me to come over walk through and the no dramas. So I took him for a walk, walk through and they then showed me these 3d visualisations from a designer in Spain, and asked if it was a project I wanted to do. And although we've done a lot of, you know, we, we do quite high end work. This was to another level, like, regardless of when I was apprentice, when I did, when I did high end residential buildings as well, it was our highest scope work that I've ever done. And it was sort of like, I feel like it's almost going to break us through into that realm. It's exciting project, I've got a lot of content, this whole plan that I haven't released yet. I'm excited to show everyone.

Aaron Kyle
So will give us a bit of insight into so why why was it challenging because the the access and the brief?

Sam Barlow
Yeah, it was just what was shown one of the most frustrating parts, but also the, the most challenging part and or, but also, the most exciting part was what was shown on the renders, as all builders know, sometimes this can be a little bit hard to make where the designer and my client, it was pretty much know what's there is getting built and the amount of structural work that went into a body corporate building, which anyone knows trying to do structural changes to embody corporate buildings is an absolute no approval for everyone. It was just a lot of Yeah, to make everything work. There's a lot of hidden doors, secret doors, you know, structural changes to the common area, which was a pain in the butt in itself to get approval for but one of my most one of my favourite parts about the building, we're doing such different stuff that you never see here on the Gold Coast, you. You know, on the Gold Coast, you do a lot of coastal Hampton style homes, which is awesome as coming from a carpentry background. It's really, really enjoyable to build. But it's sort of it bought almost like a little bit of Melbourne market architecture up to the you know, you're right on the beach on Burleigh beach in this penthouse, but normally you are doing those coastal style builds, and we're doing some of the most wacky wild tiles you've ever seen where we got four different bathrooms for different tiles with crazy patterns from this Spanish design it was just was really enjoyable to do. Obviously had its had its challenges like old jobs just be able to get material up and getting massive beams up with power lines all around the building. But it was just a really, really rewarding job to do once we finished.

Aaron Kyle
So did you have to sort of set up your own access for that job.

Sam Barlow
The one of the most one of the trickiest parts of that job is around the two front sides. So long, burly Esplanade and First Avenue in Burleigh Heads, it had powerlines wrapping around it. So we couldn't lift at all from the front with our steel beams or anything, which was ended up being quite a nightmare. And we could have scaffold for a certain amount of time, but because the bill was so high end, it was nowhere near long enough. So we had a lot of just labour the boys walking up and down and then having to ask, you know, apartment blocks next door, if we can lift from over in their car parks and blocking all that sort of stuff up. It was just, I mean for maybe for some, I suppose began building companies it might be quite normal, but it was just one of those learning curves for me where hey, I knew that this is what I want to do. And it was sort of just that first stepping stone of art. You've been given this opportunity grab it with both hands and sort of show people what what Barlow building can do.

Aaron Kyle
That's where logistics comes into it. You know, it's one thing to be able to project but to actually look at the logistics side of things. It's another level

Sam Barlow
you're exactly right we there is so much time spent in thinking and planning with a lot of people I think that's one of the main differences when you're doing such high high end builds. I've even had a couple of comments of my trades so hey, you know you saw supervisors just been like staring at this wall for an hour and drawing something doesn't look like he's been doing it he's doing it you have no idea how much planning goes in from the start to get you know when you walk into this apartment specifically and you go you walk upstairs to this to the upper level and you go Oh that's awesome as an outdoor entertainment area and you actually don't know this hidden sliding bookcases hidden doors that you push open with you know bathrooms to different rooms and every time I go in there people are just like I didn't even know those rooms with our said I know it's I said the end the thought went from as soon as we demolish the place it was the thought had to go into Hey, how we're going to line all this up so that when we put all the feature buttons and everything on you know everything lines up and you can't can't see that there's doors there. It's it's pretty cool when you walk inside

Aaron Kyle
tell us about the secret bookcases. How did they work? In one of the

Sam Barlow
drawings I sort of picked up I said, Hey to the client, it's shown a bookcase in one of the drawings on this wall but in behind that bookcase is actually a kitchen so we can't have a book I said, he's I know I want the bookcase there. I said, it's not gonna work. Like there's a kitchen behind it. He may not be able to get into the kitchen and then he's I wanted to work. And then I just sat down. And sometimes we would be stuck on ideas. I'm not joking for a week, and I would have three or four my guys would brainstorm, go home, brainstorm, go home. And then I just thought to myself one day, why don't we make this big wall that's five metres wide. Slide from left to right. And as it sort of slides one way, it has battens that interlock, so you can't tell that it's open. And when it's closed completely, it just looks like a bookcase. So either way you slide it, you can't tell it's a wall. And I sort of called the designer, I said, What do you think of this idea? And he's like, are you crazy? And I said, I think I can make it work along with one of my site leaders that I've sort of worked with since like 19. So for the last eight years, we sort of brainstorm that together. And then he's sort of the chippy genius that all costs custom fabricated steel, and the whole thing just rolls from left to right. It's pretty cool.

Aaron Kyle
Now, how did you price this job, I presume you can't price it as a fixed price contract from the start? No,

Sam Barlow
we did quite a lot of cost plus projects. And this was cost plus, even when we do cost plus projects, the biggest thing of cost plus is, you know, constant updates every week of week where you are but still having something to gauge off. So we still go to our estimator and get a full builders quote, an estimated as best we can. And then we can still at least track it along the build. So it's like, hey, you know, we originally allowed $200,000 in cabinetry or whatever, we're starting to notice we're probably gonna go over and he's still sort of trapped, but a job like that couldn't go into it fixed price. It's just

Aaron Kyle
yeah, like there's a, there's a saying in construction law about cost plus his trust, like you said, you have to be able to manage the client and hold their hand through it and constantly cross check and, and check in. That's the only way you can successfully manage them.

Sam Barlow
That's where this again, like honesty and communication comes into it. It's you have to be extremely honest, you have to but the communication has to be clear. You hear stories all the time of you know, builders, are they charged me, you know, they didn't pass their discount on all day, you know, whatever it is, they charged me a different rate. What's the invoice for if something went wrong? Imagine not being able to just know what correct what you know what you've lied about. And when you haven't just be honest with everything cost plus is a safe contract fee that every time we had a cost plus contract, it's just like, I've been given a safe contract. You know, you're getting paid whatever your payment terms state, do the right thing by the owners. Normally, you know, the first month or two they asked you for copies of invoices and stuff, send them send them over straightaway and always I always encourage them to ask me I said asked me at the start because then you'll get over asked me because you everything you asked me for is going to be aboveboard, like it's just that bloody easy. And then I said, you know, then every now and then if you just want to be like, Hey, I didn't care I was a $200 receipt or $20,000 invoice just asked me whatever ones you want it because they're gonna be exactly as they are every time.

Aaron Kyle
Yeah, that's right. Yeah, that's that's important. Now, shout out to the designer, we better give the designer a plug as well.

Sam Barlow
Gary from chart international path based in Spain and half based in Melbourne. He normally does all the design stuff. The Australian Open does some really funky stuff.

Aaron Kyle
Now, Sam, when you're not busy running bolo building, what do you like to do outside of work,

Sam Barlow
love, play a little bit of golf with my mates. I like my motorbikes and jet skis and stuff like that. But I mean, the older I get, the less I'm doing that the more I'm sort of starting to Charlson. I've got a few projects we're doing this year, a couple of our own developments, all of our spare time just goes into that. But honestly, at the moment, it's really what we enjoy doing on our time off. So we just got back from Bali. You know, the whole week we were there. We were just pretty much looking for three villas, for villas to buy. As cliche as it is when people say, you know, you can do what you love, you won't work a day in your life. Don't get me wrong, there's days where it's chaos, and you know, you're up on your computer to midnight and you know, things are stressful. But my partner and I both have a love for building that it makes it really easy to know what we want to do

Aaron Kyle
doing something that you love is very important and successful businesses come from from that doing what you love doing and therefore the effort to do something special with your business. It just comes naturally.

Sam Barlow
That's it definitely does.

Aaron Kyle
Now if people are listening to this and they want to get into contact with with you, Sam and your team from bio building, what's the best way to go about it?

Sam Barlow
Best Ways to either reach out to us on Instagram or on our website. We just had our website redone Barlow building.com.au Or just on our Instagram of Barlow building, send us a DM and either one of the girls in the office will let me know and we'll give you a bell.

Aaron Kyle
All right. Well, Sam from Barlow Building - Thank you for coming on to Build Hatch. I really appreciate you having on the show. And it's always good to find out how the different areas of Australia going and particularly here on the Gold Coast. Thanks for coming on the show.

Sam Barlow
No dramas at all.

Well, that was another build hatch episode with Sam Follow from Barlow building on a Gold Coast in sunny Queensland. As we discussed, Sam and his team are working on some of the Gold Coast's amazing up and coming projects. And I certainly encourage you to check out our socials for an insight into their leading work as usual if you know a hard worker having a go in the construction space for a building related business personal product, we love what they are doing or selling them, please do get into contact with us. And we'll be more than happy to tell their story and get behind their goods or services on the build hatch marketplace. Our team are busy rolling out independent sells on build hatch.com As we speak, so stay tuned for more and more products and services as they onboard. As usual, please check out our Instagram page and other socials, where you'll be able to learn more about our guests and some of the features of the work that we talked about. Have a great week and hear me again on the airwaves next week. Thanks for listening to another episode of Build Hatch.